Clueless to Ironman

Clueless to Ironman

Clueless to Ironman

2020-01-04

Sometimes I still can't believe the amount of change that has happened these last few years. I was JUST a runner for so many years. I was the person who rarely went any more than 1 day a week without running. So of course there was no time for any other sports.

The day I became a triathlete at The Big Foot Beach Triathlon, I had some mixed emotions. I was thrilled to complete an event that some people aren't able to. However, during the race I had a few wake up calls. I had made it through the swim without a panic attack, but I knew I was very slow. I panted like a dog up every hill on the bike. My legs were heavy from the bike and as a result I had one of my worst runs to date. I was running on a grass trail that aggravated an old injury. I had finished, but it wasn't pretty. But of course, I wanted more. 

Let's just make a long story short and say that I was ready for a challenge. I told my boyfriend I was thinking about it. I asked the fastest girl in school if I was capable. I told my family I was going to sign up. It was settled. September 7th, 2014 – that was the day I was going to become an Ironman at Ironman Wisconsin. I had just over a year to go from a clueless triathlete to Ironman. Upgrades needed to be made and research needed to be done. And I couldn't be more excited.

I had a great group of friends who helped educate me the best they could. They guided me in the pool. They told me what was necessary to buy and what wasn't. They were my triathlon lifeline. But how was I going to train for this? Who would tell me how many miles a week I should be riding and running. How often should I be in open water versus the pool? I needed some serious help, and I knew exactly who to call.

About The Author

Dana James Assistant

People frequently say things on the Internet that they would never say to someone in person. There’s something disinhibiting about the anonymity that the screen provides (thus the bacchanalian antics at masquerade parties). So the more salient you can make each person’s identify. This is why online communities that include photos of the participants are generally better behaved that are text-only.

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3 Comments

  • Kevin Dawson Managing Director
    2 days ago reply

    People frequently say things on the Internet that they would never say to someone in person. There’s something disinhibiting about the anonymity that the screen provides (thus the bacchanalian antics at masquerade parties). So the more salient you can make each person’s identify. This is why online communities that include photos of the participants are generally better behaved that are text-only.

    • Kevin Dawson Managing Director
      2 days ago reply

      People frequently say things on the Internet that they would never say to someone in person. There’s something disinhibiting about the anonymity that the screen provides (thus the bacchanalian antics at masquerade parties). So the more salient you can make each person’s identify. This is why online communities that include photos of the participants are generally better behaved that are text-only.

  • Kevin Dawson Managing Director
    2 days ago reply

    People frequently say things on the Internet that they would never say to someone in person. There’s something disinhibiting about the anonymity that the screen provides (thus the bacchanalian antics at masquerade parties). So the more salient you can make each person’s identify. This is why online communities that include photos of the participants are generally better behaved that are text-only.

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